Friday, 11 November 2005

My favourite Kittel articles

Kittel’s TDNT is a monumental work of the finest scholarship. My favourite articles are the ones by Bultmann; he wrote 27 of the articles, and some of them (e.g. Gnosis, Faith, Life, Death) are so big and so excellent that they were reprinted separately as monographs (in Harper’s Bible Key Words series).

NOTE: This post originally contained links to a site which offered Kittel online; I have since learned that this website is publishing the material illegally, so I have altered the post and removed the links.

7 Comments:

Jim said...

But Ben, the inclusion of TDNT violates copyright law. There are things on that site that are legitimately in the public arena- but many, including Kittel, are illegally posted.

We discussed this matter a while back and several of the bibliobloggers pulled their links because of the ethical implications of providing links to illegal materials.

Eerdmans still holds the right of publication as do many of the other publishers of materials on that site.

Jim said...

By the way- here's an earlier entry on just this topic:

http://biblical-studies.blogspot.com/2005/09/tdnt-biblecentre-and-copyright.html

Ben Myers said...

Gasp! Somehow I missed this earlier discussion of the copyright violation, and I simply assumed that Eerdmans must have given appropriate permissions to this website.

Anyway, I have quickly altered the post, and have removed the links to the pirated material. Thanks, Jim, for pointing this out.

Michael F. Bird said...

Ben,
Maybe you could comment on TDNT in light of James Barr's critique which raises some serious questions about trying to get theology out of language.

Ben Myers said...

Hi Mike. Yeah, I think there's a lot to be said for this critique. There's also the important point that the whole methodology of TDNT rests on a sort of Hegelian view of language, in which the true meaning of a term is thought to be uncovered by its etymology and early development. (And we now know that Wittgenstein was exactly right: the meaning of a word is not its origin, but its usage). But in spite of all that, I don't love TDNT any less!

I'd be really interested to know about any other important scholarship that critiques TDNT -- can you point me to any good articles?

Michael F. Bird said...

Ben,
Maybe you could comment on TDNT in light of James Barr's critique which raises some serious questions about trying to get theology out of language.

Ben Myers said...

Hi Mike. Yeah, I think there's a lot to be said for this critique. There's also the important point that the whole methodology of TDNT rests on a sort of Hegelian view of language, in which the true meaning of a term is thought to be uncovered by its etymology and early development. (And we now know that Wittgenstein was exactly right: the meaning of a word is not its origin, but its usage). But in spite of all that, I don't love TDNT any less!

I'd be really interested to know about any other important scholarship that critiques TDNT -- can you point me to any good articles?

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