Friday, 4 September 2009

Rediscovering Christian social thought: Phillip Blond in Melbourne

Phillip Blond will be in Melbourne next month, 23 October, for a conference on Christian social thought. There’s now a call for papers relating to themes such as:

  • Historical formulations of Christian Social Thought
  • Associative relationships in theology, economics, and society
  • Re-framing social justice
  • Theological liberalism and conservatism/political liberalism and conservatism
  • Economics, capital ownership and markets in Christian Social Thought
  • Christian Social Thought and notions of Left and Right
It looks like it will be an excellent event – I might see you there!

18 Comments:

Anthony Paul Smith said...

So, what was that before about being beyond Right and Left?

Adam Kotsko said...

I agree that this event sounds excellent, if you leave out all the topics they're discussing and get rid of Phillip Blond.

nate kerr said...

The phrase "Christian social agenda" is alone enough to spend chills up my spine.

Adam Kotsko said...

And since we're already being a bunch of negative dicks, I might as well point this out now: you and Halden really overuse the word "excellent." Practically everything you link to, you declare "excellent." If it's not "excellent," it's a close synonym. What ever happened to a simple "interesting"? Or why not just describe the post, article, event, etc., in non-evaluative terms and leave it for the reader to determine its quality level?

Ben Myers said...

Excellent point, Adam. (No seriously, it really is a good point: I'll try to keep it in mind.)

As for the conference theme: I'm just presupposing the fact that political theology is really about ecclesiology. So if you approach it in that way, I don't think you need any "Christian social agenda" (yes, the phrase gives me chills too) in order to enjoy a conference like this.

Anthony Paul Smith said...

Ben,

That's a rather dangerous position, no? It is like blinding yourself. How is political theology like this really about ecclesiology if it is about taking political power? Even if that taking of power is only as one saddled up next to the powerful.

Alex said...

Particularly in the case of Blond, who is going out of his way with seeking material political power rather than building a church.

Hill said...

The comment thread delivered exactly what I was hoping for. Here's to hoping it turns in to a 150+ comment behemoth. It's Friday! (in America, at least)

Anthony Paul Smith said...

You were hoping for a really long respectful conversation about the nature of politics and religion?

Chris Donato said...

Hill, unless the transformationists start circling the wagons, this one's dead in the water…

myleswerntz said...

the AUFS are coming! the AUFS are coming!

Anthony Paul Smith said...

That's right bitches.

Anthony Paul Smith said...

Or, if that's too sexist, that's right... buckos.

Anonymous said...

I love theocracy and you should too.

Alex said...

Seriously though, I would be annoyed if this chance to consider whether 'red toryism' is genuinely transformative, or warmed over neoliberalism, which like much neoliberalism, borrows Christian rhetorical strategies when it occasionally suits it.

Hill said...

Bitches and buckos, eh?

Anonymous said...

Bravo Alex and Anthony

Ben Myers said...

Forget about "beyond Left and Right". At this rate, we'll need a conference on "beyond F&T and AUFS"... (And like any good conference, we can skip the papers and just go cuss each other out at the bar.)

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