Tuesday, 26 January 2010

Earn more than your professors: become a student!

LeRon Shults has now posted the full details for the University of Agder's new PhD scholarships in theology. Recipients of the scholarship will be employed by the University for three years and will receive a salary of approximately 353,200 kroner (about US$61,000) per year, as well as office space, travel funds, contributions to a pension, etc. Applications close 15 April – LeRon has all the details.

9 Comments:

Robert Minto said...

This blows my mind...

Terry Wright said...

The salary compensates for the fact that you'd need to learn Norwegian.

goyvind80 said...

Offended (as a Norwegian speaker). Learning Norwegian will enable you to read Henrik Ibsen and Knut Hamsun in their original language. It will enable you to read Swedish and Danish (practically the same language) and thus read e.g. Strindberg and Kierkegaard in their original languages. Norwegian also has many structural similarities to German, which are very helpful to understand the German theological idiom.
As for the good conditions for PhD Students, welcome to the socialist Petrostan! High taxes+lots of oil= high standards of living.

6p00d8341c35de53ef said...

Actually, you do NOT need to learn Norwegian. Lectures and discussions are in English. All papers and the dissertation may be written in ENGLISH.

LeRon Shults

P.S. But I agree with all of goyvind80's other comments ...especially the Kierkegaard part ;)

Terry Wright said...

Goyvind80 and LeRon - just a joke! No offence intended. I guess such things don't translate too well electronically. Oh, well.

In all seriousness, though, surely if one were to live in Norway, it would make sense to learn Norwegian, even if the papers, etc., can be in English.

Anthony Paul Smith said...

Is this a variation on the Nigerian prince scam?

Anonymous said...

the Norwegian prince scam??

augustinian said...

Norwegian PhD students do regularly complain about their conditions. It should perhaps be mentioned that a good deal of their research is often already completed by the time they get to this stage because of the long time it takes to do BAs and MAs, and the gap between the latter and PhD. The average age of a PhD starter is often around 34.

That said, I would really appreciate some international presence in the Norwegian environment - I believe LeRon and I are kind of loners out here!

There are also Post-docs going, in case anyone's interested in Mediaeval studies... Check out the University of Bergen's current project (http://www.uib.no/cms/en/research/research-plan).

Chris Donato said...

Yet again grateful that I chose a trade and not the academy…

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